Farm Share Week 10 Aug 6-9, 2014

Farm Share Week 10 Aug 6-9, 2014

Week 10 is here and  we’re nearly half way though the farm share program!  Jennifer has a greeting from the farm below 🙂

Greetings from the farm:

Our strangely cool summer continues as the East and West coasts of Canada bake like enchiladas (sorry, I couldn’t resist the food reference). Even the weed “explosition” which normally comes in July is just happening now. Normally around that time I think, “boy, we are doing such a great job keeping the weeds down and BOOM! They turn into man-sized jungles seemingly overnight. The main effect on the farm of the cool weather is slower growth, and thus lower yields. This doesn’t effect your box too much because we use smaller quantities.

One more note, thanks again for buying local, and keep fighting for it in your other purchases! We have noticed many times that wholesalers or retailers are buying a very small amount of Ontario produce and a large amount of Quebec and U.S. produce (both of which have lower labour costs and thus are usually cheaper) and claim to have “run out” of Ontario produce, which though available sometimes goes to waste. It’s pretty rare to find a big business that keeps the consumer’s and farmer’s best interests in mind, hence the beauty of a CSA like Farm Share. Aren’t you glad for the simplicity of getting your food right from the farmer: no games…just great food?

This week we have cauliflower, which I am so excited for. Normally because of this pest that is extremely difficult to control called swede midge, our cauliflower, broccoli and Brussels sprouts yields are abysmal! But, I think we can manage to do cauliflower for all this week. The colouration may be a little more yellowy or purple than people are used to. This is because they were exposed to sunlight. I hope that everyone can appreciate this delicious, nutritious and versatile veg even if they are not 100% perfect. There is some broccoli actually growing as well so we will likely have these for whole shares next week. I think our total yield from an entire field of broccoli was like 12 bunches last year, so I take none of these wonderful veggies for granted. They are a huge blessing!

What else is new? Turnips and rutabaga. I think this is the first year I can actually recognize the difference. Your turnip will come in bunches and rutabaga, just the roots. The turnips have softer, green leaves and are generally smaller while the rutabagas grow very large and have hearty, purple-stalked leaves. Both are a suitable potato substitute and make a mean mash with garlic and butter of course. You can even enjoy them raw, especially the rutabaga. They also rock in stews and soups. Also, everyone’s favourite clove, garlic! You will see only 2-3 heads because they are worth about $8 a pound for Ontario organic. I bet you can figure out what to do with those ;).

Half Share
-grape or saladette tomatoes (grape tomatoes are smaller and saladettes are larger and look similar)’
-green beans
-snow or sugar snap peas
-zucchini (if you are getting sick of these, google it and the recipe possibilities will blow your mind!)
-cucumber
-green leaf lettuce
-black kale
-turnips or rutabaga (root veggies with a white/purple colouration)
-garlic bulbs
-cauliflower

Whole Share
-grape and saladette tomatoes (grape tomatoes are smaller and saladettes are larger and look similar)’
-green beans
-snow or sugar snap peas
-zucchini (if you are getting sick of these, google it and the recipe possibilities will blow your mind!)
-cucumber
-green leaf lettuce
-black kale
-turnips or rutabaga (root veggies with a white/purple colouration)
-garlic bulbs
-cauliflower
-fennel (used in Greek foods, nice cooked or raw)
-garlic chives
-carrots
-red swiss chard
-beets
-red leaf lettuce

Recipe this week is caramelized turnips or rutabaga

  • 3 cups diced peeled turnips
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 cube chicken bouillon
  • 1 tablespoon butter, or more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons cane sugar

Directions:
Place the turnips into a skillet with the water and chicken bouillon cube over medium heat, and simmer until the water has evaporated and the turnips are tender, about 15 minutes. Stir in the butter, let melt, and sprinkle on the sugar. Gently cook and stir the turnips until the butter and sugar cook into a brown, sticky coating on the turnips, about 10 minutes. Serve hot.

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